Des Noise
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this story from USA Today four days ago was in my newspaper today

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It’s a tape, but I recorded it digital to digital to analog - when I proofed the tapes, I proofed two WAV files!

John Darnielle of the Mountain Goats: on Cassettes, Gogol and Sriracha - Orange County Music - Heard Mentality

Ned Raggett posted this interview on Facebook a day or two ago, and I’m finally getting caught up.

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I think tapes have their own energy,” John Darnielle of the Mountain Goats said via e-mail. “I get pretty ’70s Californian about this stuff, but I think the means by which a person receives art — literature, film, music — contributes to the experience.
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shorterexcerpts:

peterwknox:

gregbrown:

David Foster Wallace, speaking of something missing.

(excerpted from this interview, offered up as evidence)

David Foster Wallace would have been 48 years old last week. It still hurts, but re-reading McSweeney’s memories and tributes helped.

I’m liking the new style Greg, but wanted to call these parts out. Thanks.

I downloaded this last week, but only listened to it just now. I think it’s very relevant in light of the cassette discussion and Tom Ewing’s excellent CD piece. I especially appreciate the flash of self-awareness at the end: “When we’re saying it, are we just saying exactly what people our age said a hundred years ago? There’s no way ever to know how different we are. Things seem different.”

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Amazon.com: Cassette Mythos (9780936756691): Robin James, Dave Mandl, Neil Strauss, Sue Ann Harkey: Books
I now know this exists, too. Another one I hope I get some time to dig into. Thanks, pitchfork.tumblr.com, for the tip! (And thanks to Eric Harvey at Marathon Packs for the previous book recommendation— forgot to say that earlier.)

Amazon.com: Cassette Mythos (9780936756691): Robin James, Dave Mandl, Neil Strauss, Sue Ann Harkey: Books

I now know this exists, too. Another one I hope I get some time to dig into. Thanks, pitchfork.tumblr.com, for the tip! (And thanks to Eric Harvey at Marathon Packs for the previous book recommendation— forgot to say that earlier.)

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My favorite tape is the one with the eight-inch audio jack coming out of it.
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Some great music has come to exist only because the stakes in its creation were so low.

Online Notebook - Cassette Monday: For real this time.

Lots of provocative thoughts here, including the one quoted above.

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149 plays

Poison Control Center: “Grow Up and Marry Your Best Friend”

One of my favorite songs from one of my favorite tape-only releases, from my favorite band in Iowa. The now-defunct Popgun Recordings released this super rough but, I think, sloppily endearing cassette EP, Did They Live Happily Ever After?, way back in 2005. The tape consists of 14 psych-tinged indie-pop songs Patrick Tape Fleming recorded mostly by himself (this song features backing vocals from seven young women who worked with him at the Children’s Museum in Indianapolis) around the time he met the woman who has since made him an honest man and put the Tape in his name. So they did live happily ever after, after all.

Call me sentimental, call me twee, but I’m an absolute sucker for this kind of thing.

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